Submission History: Motion by Bailie Christy Mearns:- "Council acknowledges that car-centric transport design has created many significant negative impacts on quality of life for communities across Glasgow and the West of Scotland, particularly those bordering the M8 motorway, including ongoing physical barriers, unattractive and unsafe routes for walking, wheeling and cycling, and increased noise and air pollution. Council notes that transport is Scotland's biggest contributor of greenhouse gas emissions; that car and van use accounts for over half of these emissions; that uncontrolled access to roads creates more vehicle traffic through induced demand; and that negative impacts are not evenly distributed as around half of Glasgow's households do not own a car, yet dominant road infrastructure and excessive car-use affects those experiencing poverty and inequality the most. Council reaffirms recent commitments made in Glasgow's Strategic Plan 2022-2027 to reduce the impact of the M8 on the city centre and to explore longer-term replacement options; as well as commitments in Glasgow's City Centre Transport Plan to reduce vehicle kilometres by 20% by 2030, and to "offer a more liveable, people friendly urban environment [which] uses its space and streets differently". Council notes that reversing the long-standing dominance of car use in favour of people-friendly environments is a significant challenge, however it is absolutely necessary in order to reduce health inequality, address climate change and to support a sustainable economy. Council notes that repair works and the propping up of the Woodside Viaduct alone will cost upwards of 100 million and last until at least the end of 2024 - one year and 65 million over original estimates; and that recent Freedom of Information requests have revealed that Transport Scotland are currently not assessing all immediate mitigation measures, including lower speed limits, which could address traffic volumes, air and noise pollution, as well as the number and cost of collisions. Council believes that the public cost of maintaining an ageing motorway is so significant as to warrant further investigation of possible alternatives, including but not limited to, full replacement; and that public money should be spent on achieving incremental change and not simply maintaining the status quo. This will require close collaboration with external partners and an urgent commitment to work jointly to move forward with these objectives. To this end, Council therefore asks the City Convener for Climate, Glasgow Green Deal, Transport and City Centre Recovery to (1) write to the Scottish Transport Minister to: - formally request Transport Scotland's involvement in and a funding contribution towards Glasgow City Council's research into reducing the impact of the M8 on Glasgow city centre; - formally request a 6-month trial of 30mph speed limits on city centre sections of the M8; and - request a review of powers to extend the Low Emission Zone to motorway roads; and (2) bring a report on existing air quality monitoring taking place along the motorway to the relevant city policy committee within six months." Help Icon

This is the history for the submission "Motion by Bailie Christy Mearns:- "Council acknowledges that car-centric transport design has created many significant negative impacts on quality of life for communities across Glasgow and the West of Scotland, particularly those bordering the M8 motorway, including ongoing physical barriers, unattractive and unsafe routes for walking, wheeling and cycling, and increased noise and air pollution. Council notes that transport is Scotland's biggest contributor of greenhouse gas emissions; that car and van use accounts for over half of these emissions; that uncontrolled access to roads creates more vehicle traffic through induced demand; and that negative impacts are not evenly distributed as around half of Glasgow's households do not own a car, yet dominant road infrastructure and excessive car-use affects those experiencing poverty and inequality the most. Council reaffirms recent commitments made in Glasgow's Strategic Plan 2022-2027 to reduce the impact of the M8 on the city centre and to explore longer-term replacement options; as well as commitments in Glasgow's City Centre Transport Plan to reduce vehicle kilometres by 20% by 2030, and to "offer a more liveable, people friendly urban environment [which] uses its space and streets differently". Council notes that reversing the long-standing dominance of car use in favour of people-friendly environments is a significant challenge, however it is absolutely necessary in order to reduce health inequality, address climate change and to support a sustainable economy. Council notes that repair works and the propping up of the Woodside Viaduct alone will cost upwards of 100 million and last until at least the end of 2024 - one year and 65 million over original estimates; and that recent Freedom of Information requests have revealed that Transport Scotland are currently not assessing all immediate mitigation measures, including lower speed limits, which could address traffic volumes, air and noise pollution, as well as the number and cost of collisions. Council believes that the public cost of maintaining an ageing motorway is so significant as to warrant further investigation of possible alternatives, including but not limited to, full replacement; and that public money should be spent on achieving incremental change and not simply maintaining the status quo. This will require close collaboration with external partners and an urgent commitment to work jointly to move forward with these objectives. To this end, Council therefore asks the City Convener for Climate, Glasgow Green Deal, Transport and City Centre Recovery to (1) write to the Scottish Transport Minister to: - formally request Transport Scotland's involvement in and a funding contribution towards Glasgow City Council's research into reducing the impact of the M8 on Glasgow city centre; - formally request a 6-month trial of 30mph speed limits on city centre sections of the M8; and - request a review of powers to extend the Low Emission Zone to motorway roads; and (2) bring a report on existing air quality monitoring taking place along the motorway to the relevant city policy committee within six months."".

It shows every meeting that the submission went before and links to the agenda for those meetings.


Committee Meeting View Agenda
Glasgow City Council 30/03/2023 Click here